Market: How to win the “attention battle”

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Whichever company invests the biggest budget in to its online store and the advertising campaigns around it – i.e. beats the loudest drums – will be the most successful – and then the “smaller” companies can pack their bags? (Fortunately) it’s not that simple. At the Online Print Symposium 2024, Dr. Christian Maaß from thomann spoke about how to win the “attention battle” for customers’ attention, even against the big web platforms. The focus was primarily on the “basics” of digital commerce.

Dr. Christian Maaß is no stranger to regular visitors to the Online Print Symposium, as he has already held various management positions at Flyeralarm and Cimpress. Today, he is Managing Director and CDO at Thomann Music, the world’s largest retailer of musical instruments. “And why are we the world’s largest retailer?” asked Dr. Maaß rhetorically. “Because we have mastered the basics. Even those of e-commerce.” He explained that the sales staff in stationary retail, which only accounts for 2% of the €1.4 billion turnover, are all professional musicians and advise their customers as equals. It’s about knowing what the customer wants and also knowing how to play the instrument themselves. “Because a customer who has decided on a violin costing €10,000, for example, is not just buying the instrument, but the emotions,” says Maaß.

This philosophy has been transferred to the online store. The company does not constantly change prices or offer discounts, but always sells at its regular price. Discounts only shift sales, such as Black Friday, which shifts December sales into November. 

That’s why Thomann doesn’t worry about trends, but follows customer requirements and concentrates on the basics:

  • Keep it simple – focus on getting the basics right
  • Be able to answer your customers’ first three questions – no matter what they are about
  • Avoid decoupling the tools from the tasks to be done
  • Identify the decision-makers in the company – those who have in-depth expertise – and involve them
  • Where does digital really make a difference and where is it just smoke and mirrors?
  • Define the fixed points: Keep structure and processes stable to create the most “bang for the buck”

That’s why Thomann doesn’t sell on Amazon. “They can’t maintain the level of quality we have. Musical instruments have to be serviced. That’s why we employ 300 people who set up the instruments for their respective applications. For example, a double bass for classical music or for jazz,” said Dr. Maaß. Because you have to take the complexity away from the customer. In that case, 100% service equals 100% loyalty.

And it is precisely these basic rules that apply across all industries and that print service providers can also take to heart for their online stores. After all, print and musical instruments only seem to have nothing in common at first glance – at second glance, however, the two have one thing in particular in common: they both convey and inspire emotions.

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Market: How to win the "attention battle"
Article Name
Market: How to win the "attention battle"
Description
Whichever company invests the biggest budget in to its online store and the advertising campaigns around it - i.e. beats the loudest drums - will be the most successful - and then the "smaller" companies can pack their bags? (Fortunately) it's not that simple. At the Online Print Symposium 2024, Dr. Christian Maaß from thomann spoke about how to win the "attention battle" for customers' attention, even against the big web platforms. The focus was primarily on the "basics" of digital commerce.
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Beyond-print.net

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, Owner: (Registered business address: Germany), processes personal data only to the extent strictly necessary for the operation of this website. All details in the privacy policy.